Clarification on release status

When looking at GitHub releases, the latest release that is no pre-release is 10.0.1.
When looking at the CHANGELOG in master, the latest release without an alpha/beta/rc suffix seems to be 10.1.1.
On NPM, latest points to 10.0.1 and next points to 10.1.0.

Which of these versions are we supposed to use/test? When does a version (with/without suffix) get published to NPM?

We usually publish an announcement when there is a relevant release that does need testing from a broader audience (either via the blog, or via the forum for smaller intermediate / dev releases).

The next announcement for 10.1.1 will be coming soon, then it will also be set to latest on npm.

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The next announcement for 10.1.1 will be coming soon, then it will also be set to latest on npm.

For clarity, 10.1.1 is currently not on NPM at all. next points to 10.1.0, which is the latest version on there.
Do new versions get mentioned in the changelog before the release is made, or is the version heading in the changelog changed from master to the released version on release?

New versions get mentioned in the changelog before the release is made.

We will release 10.1.1 in time for the announcement blog post.

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Looking to get into rescript properly over the holidays. Is this the release that will have async await? Will this be in the docs - any examples? Does the community prefer the newer promises in the end or what makes one approach more useful than the other.

Have the approach to bindings been improved a fair bit in this release too or is that in another release? I think there was a guide to bindings by yawar amin is that still up to date and relevant given these changes?

Yes, release 10.1.x contains support for async/await syntax which is already mentioned in the docs, albeit briefly.

I think promise libraries are still useful, especially for promise chaining, but for all the single api calls I now use the new async/await syntax.

Concerning bindings, the recent optional record fields make it so much nicer to bind to the typical JS config objects, no more creation functions needed, it looks like JS now.

The bindings cookbook exists as a ReScript version: https://github.com/rescriptbr/rescript-bindings-cookbook and most of it is still up-to-date and idiomatic.

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Excellent , thanks for your reply.

How do I try 10.1? I’m not sure what to put in my package.json.

“rescript”: “10.1.0”

Embarrassed. That was obvious. It didn’t autocomplete so I thought I needed to type something like rescript@next or get it from some alternative server.

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You can also do
npm install rescript@next